Great Britain

Drug of Choice
November 26, 1990

In the mid-1980s, as word of the French abortion pill rippled across the world, the new drug was greeted as a thing of awesome powers.

The Winds of Windsorism
December 11, 1989

Prince Charles's war against Modern architecture.

Liberalism: Illusions and Realities
June 24, 1970

Does Kirk's "Conservative Mind" make any sense?

Fulbright on Camera
May 21, 1966

Because he is using his powers as chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee to pressure President Johnson into a change of foreign policy, the name of Senator J. William Fulbright was dropped with a clang from the White House social list for six months, from last September until this March, when President Johnson apparently decided that wasn’t the way to influence an Arkansan. Fulbright’s response to the cease-fire took the form of three Christian A.

Can de Gaulle Do it?
March 02, 1963

His "twilight" has been proclaimed many times.

The British-American Difference
September 24, 1945

NO PROBLEM OF first importance in international relations it less understood in the United States than the economic divergence between the United States and Great Britain. The sudden and unilateral cancellation of Lend-Lease by President Truman has led to a hasty attempt by foreign correspondents and commentators to explain the British situation. But most of these efforts are incomplete and have not sunk far into the American consciousness.

Save China!
July 20, 1942

THE HEARTBREAKING PROBLEM for the United States in this war is the fact that we are forced to fight on every front simultaneously before we are really ready to fight on any one of them. We are forced to fight on all fronts partly for military reasons and partly for political ones: without passing judgment on the desirability of defending Australia at this moment, one may say that it was politically impossible not to aid her to a substantial extent; and the same is true of some other areas.

Poison Gas in This War
April 27, 1942

WHAT HAS HAPPENED to gas warfare? Will gas be used before the war ends? These questions have been asked for the past two year and it is more important than ever now for us to know the answers. If gas is to be used, we must be prepared for it. If there is little chance of chemical warfare, we need not worry about gas masks, decontamination materials and all the complicated and expensive business of gas defense, but may use our energy for other important work. Until Japan entered the war the question, “Why hasn’t gas been used?” was a good one.

Keep the Offensive!
July 14, 1941

The American occupation of Iceland and the substantial American forces sent to Trinidad and British Guiana are grand good news. They mean that he giant of the Western World is at last rousing him-self from his long, almost fatal lethargy and is preparing to fight for his way of life. Iceland in German hands would be a great danger to American security, It could control North Atlantic shipping so as to make supplies to England almost impossible.

Britain Veers Toward Germany
July 17, 1935

Whitehall has just witnessed an unusual meeting between British and German naval officers. With the utmost good nature they have fixed the tonnage with which each of them shall enter the next world war. For every hundred tons that the British launch as targets for German shells and torpedoes, the Germans shall have thirty-five tons, charged with all the instruments of destruction that civilization has devised.

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