Health

Before Sunrise
November 12, 2009

When President Obama arrives in Tokyo on Friday, he will confront a country that seeks to be an ally of the United States. For Japan has never been an American ally. It was first a rival, then an enemy, and finally, after it lost the war it foolishly started with the U.S., it became a protectorate, not an ally.   The distinction matters. An alliance is an institution negotiated between two sovereign governments in which each agrees to a series of reciprocal obligations that have the force of law.

Mass Appeal
November 12, 2009

Polls show that Americans are confused about what health care reform means. And, if you listen to members of Congress on television, you get the impression that some of them aren’t certain, either. But figuring out what health care reform entails isn’t hard. All you have to do is look at Massachusetts. Almost three years ago, the state introduced an ambitious initiative designed to make sure nearly all residents have health insurance. Under this scheme, the state requires employers to contribute toward the cost of covering workers, while requiring individuals to get insurance.

Response to My Anti-Statism Article
November 11, 2009

I got an email from an old friend, Joel Parker, who is an international vice president of the Transportation Communications Union, and one of the smartest people I know. It's a response to my article  on anti-Statism in America that has been on the site today. I am reproducing it for its criticisms rather than its compliments, which bear not only on what I wrote but also on our continuing discussion of the health care bill. Just read your latest TNR piece on anti-government sentiment. I thought it was excellent, and agreed with its central point.

Today at TNR (November 11, 2009)
November 11, 2009

Why Americans Hate to Love the Government, by John B. Judis How Drug Companies Plan to Make a Killing Off of Health Care Reform, by Jonathan Cohn The ‘Should We Stay or Should We Go’ Matrix: Where Our Top Opinion-Makers Stand on the Afghanistan Question, by Barron YoungSmith, Ben Bernstein, Noah Kristula-Green, and Julie Sobel Seven Reasons Why We Probably Won’t Have a Health Care Bill Before Christmas, by Suzy Khimm Which Important Federal Agency Is Being Run by People Who Have Overstayed Their Term by Three Years?

New Evidence of Pharma's Sweetheart Deal
November 10, 2009

Critics have complained that a drug industry got a sweetheart deal when it struck a bargain with the White House and Senate Finance Committee over health care reform. There’s new reason to think those critics were right. It comes from an October forecast by IMS Health, a respected global research and consulting firm. The report, which IMS distributed to clients and which a source provided, projects that the drug industry will see average annual growth of 3.5 percent between 2008 and 2013. Back in March, IMS had projected no growth at all during that same five-year stretch.

Board to Death
November 10, 2009

To the frustration of many a cabinet secretary, the Obama administration is a little behind on its appointments. At this point—with only five weeks to go before the Senate breaks for recess—a little over half of the 514 positions that need filling have been filled. Some jobs are really important: The nominee for the Office of Legal Counsel has been held up for months. Obama’s choice for a USAID director came down just today. U.S. attorney nominations have slowed to a crawl. Other jobs?

Today in "Too Big To Fail": More Shrinkage Momentum
November 10, 2009

Very interesting development on the "too big to fail" front today: The Journal reports that Colorado Rep. Ed Perlmutter is planning an amendment to the systemic risk bill currently before the House Financial Services committee. The amendment would partly revive certain New Deal-era restrictions on banks:  Rep. Ed Perlmutter (D., Colo.) is working on a separate amendment that would allow bank regulators to impose restrictions prohibiting certain companies from operating both a commercial bank and an investment bank if capital reserves fall below a certain level.

Abortion, Catholics, and the Health Care Bill
November 10, 2009

Alan Wolfe is a TNR contributing editor and director of the Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life at Boston College. Just before the House of Representatives voted on the Stupak Amendment, designed to stop any public funding of insurance plans that cover abortion, the U. S. Conference on Catholic Bishops (USCCB) weighed in with its endorsement.

Today at TNR (November 10, 2009)
November 10, 2009

Don’t Underestimate Europe’s Ability to Integrate Its Muslim Minorities, by Anne Applebaum The Abortion Amendment Debate: What Kind of Power Do Catholics Have in the Democratic Party? by William Galston and Alan Wolfe Why Scientists Are, By Definition, Activists, by Marilyn Berlin Snell Should We Let Health Care Reform Fail So We Can Do It Right Next Time? by Jonathan Cohn Is It Too Early to Call the Fort Hood Shootings an Act of Terrorism? by John B.

The Abortion Amendment Debate: What Kind of Power Do Catholics Have in the Democratic Party?
November 10, 2009

One of the most contentious aspects of this weekend's House health care debate was whether federally subsidized insurance plans should be allowed to offer abortion services.

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