inequality

Republicans Suddenly Can't Stop Talking About "Mobility"

Too bad GOP policies are undercutting it

The unpleasant truth: When the government keeps slashing its safety net, climbing the economic ladder gets harder. 

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In making his case for socialized law, Noam Scheiber implies that lawyers for poor and middle class clients don’t do as good a job as lawyers for rich clients.

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The Case for Socialized Law


Inequality has bent American justice. Here's a radical way to fix it.

When a rich person can buy more justice than a normal person, it perverts society. Here's a radical idea for fixing it.

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The Inequality Speech That Wasn't

Obama's State of the Union went easy on class rhetoric

Yes, he used the "i" word. But was it that different than all that's come before?

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Income inequality is at its highest since 1928. What does this mean for the State of the Union?

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Here's How We Should Think About the Inequality Debate

We need a whole new framework

"Inequality" is a concept too sweeping and cluttered to lead to useful solutions. Here's how we should actually think about it.

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For Republicans, the Decline of Social Mobility is a Crisis

Why is the GOP suddenly talking poverty? Because it's harder to defend capitalism now.

The GOP is finally facing the issue of inequality in America. But why?

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Bill Clinton endorsed Bill de Blasio's inequality rhetoric yesterday. That's not what Hillary Clinton told Goldman Sachs a few weeks ago.

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Please, Liberals: Stop Abusing 'A Tale of Two Cities'

It was the best of lines, it was the worst of lines

It was the best of lines, it was the worst of lines—and now it's a cliche with no connection to a great book.

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How De Blasio’s Inauguration Hinted at Wider Implications

His focus on inequality is New York-centric. Will it be heard farther afield?

The inaugural festivities on New Year’s Day’s for New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio felt awfully like an event of national import and impact. In one row next to the podium were two prospective presidential candidates, Gov. Andrew Cuomo and former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. Ceremonially swearing in de Blasio (who was officially sworn in at midnight the night before) was a former president, Bill Clinton.

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