Middle East

What Obama and American Liberals Don’t Understand About the Arab Spring
October 01, 2011

Throughout the Arab spring, analysts and policymakers have debated the proper role that the United States should be playing in the Middle East. A small number argued that the U.S. should adopt a more interventionist policy to address Arab grievances; others, that Arab grievances are themselves the result of our aggressive, interventionist policies; and still more that intervention was simply not in our national self-interest.

The Permanent Candidate
What’s driving Rick Perry?
September 28, 2011

What’s driving Rick Perry?

The Outsider
September 28, 2011

This past March, Natan Sharansky—the onetime Russian dissident and former Israeli politician—appeared at a hearing of the House Committee on Foreign Affairs to discuss the Arab Spring. It was around this time that the U.N. Security Council authorized the use of force to help embattled Libyan rebels, the first signs of unrest appeared in the southern Syrian city of Dara’a, and Egyptians were preparing to vote on changes to their constitution.

Netanyahu at the U.N.: A Speech Worth Reading
September 24, 2011

I take the liberty of suggesting that you read a speech given yesterday by Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu to the U.N. General Assembly. Netanyahu has been unlucky in the treatment of his remarks for a quarter century. He has been even more unlucky in the treatment of his offers to the Palestinian people to start the peace process which they, alas, have refused to do. An article by Neil MacFarquhar and Steven Lee Myers in the Times projects Dame Catherine Ashton, the “foreign minister” of the European Union, as the leading light in the diplomacy of Europe towards Israel/Palestine.

Obama’s Middle East Is in Tatters, Utter Tatters
September 20, 2011

It is not actually his region. Still, with the arrogance that is so characteristic of his behavior in matters he knows little about (which is a lot of matters), he entered the region as if in a triumphal march. But it wasn’t the power and sway of America that he was representing in Turkey and in Egypt. For the fact is that he has not much respect for these representations of the United States. In the mind of President Obama, in fact, these are what have wreaked havoc with our country’s standing in the world.

The Trouble With Neutrality
September 14, 2011

A World on Fire: Britain’s Crucial Role in the American Civil War By Amanda Foreman (Random House, 958 pp., $35) The world’s biggest superpower has a problem. The citizens of a nation overseas have risen up against their tyrannical rulers, determined to claim liberty even if it takes a civil war. As the most powerful global advocate of freedom, the superpower has to admire the rebels’ cause. Should it help them? Humanitarians argue that intervention can prevent hundreds of thousands of civilians from suffering hideous state-sponsored subjugation.

Why Is the Middle East Still in Thrall to 9/11 Conspiracy Theories?
September 03, 2011

The 9/11 attacks catalyzed a tremendous shift in American foreign policy in the Middle East. Rather than prioritizing petrol, Washington targeted terrorist organizations, dethroned a dictator, and lobbied throughout the region for liberalization. Yet despite the billions of dollars spent policing Baghdad and protecting Benghazi, the unpopularity of the United States in the Arab world continues to be fueled by the belief that Islamist terrorists had nothing to do with 9/11, with many claiming the attacks were an American, Israeli, or joint American-Israeli conspiracy.

Aung San Suu Kyi Isn't Under House Arrest, but She Shouldn't Press Her Luck
September 02, 2011

Aung San Suu Kyi could be forgiven for looking at the revolutions sweeping the Middle East and wondering if she could spark the same sort of upheaval in her own homeland, a country dominated by a military regime for the past four decades. After all, the Burmese opposition leader and Nobel Peace laureate retains incomparable popular support, a point that all of her public appearances since her release from house arrest last November have served to underscore.

Cambridge Journal: Where Was the Prince of Peace Baptized?
September 01, 2011

There may be some bad feelings wafting across the Jordan River. But, even in a now more tense Middle East, the relationship between the Hashemite kingdom of Jordan and the State of Israel is pretty well-tempered. There is constant contact between their intelligence services; there is cooperative work being done to rescue the Dead Sea from being no sea at all; the two countries coordinate research on the 500 million birds which migrate between them in the Jordan rift valley, the crossing from Asia and Europe to Africa ...

New Orleanians go to Atlanta, then to China
August 29, 2011

Guest post by Andre M. Perry Cities’ abilities to be resilient in the face of disasters will be the primary determinant of whether they retain their population. From New Orleans to various cities in the Middle East to London; major disasters are prone to occur in urban areas because of their inequitable pasts. However, city resiliency and their consequent future success will be based on how equitable they become before and after major crisis events. By 2050, most of the world’s population will live in urban areas. The majority of those residents will be people of color.

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