Mohamed Morsi

Hussein Morsi: My Brother's Presidency 'Was a Disaster'

But he hasn't given up hope on a Muslim Brotherhood resurgence

But he hasn't given up hope on a Muslim Brotherhood resurgence

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The Newest Victims of the Egyptian Crackdown

The generals take on the independent judges

Under former President Hosni Mubarak, Egyptians used to say outspoken political dissidents would end up going “behind the sun”—a euphemism that meant you would find yourself in the hands of the State Security Services, and may not find your way back again. A related expression often used during that period was “the walls have ears (that have walls that have ears…)”—it’s the English expression in eternal recurrence. Recently, an Arabic professor in Cairo told me he hadn’t heard either one much in the two and a half years since Mubarak’s ouster.

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CAIRO—“O Sisi! O villain! The blood of Muslims isn’t cheap!” protesters chanted. In Arabic, it rhymes. Thousands of supporters of ousted Muslim Brotherhood president Mohamed Morsi braved the midday August heat and the almost certain violence of the security forces after Friday prayers. Many had come to protest the killings that took place when the military and police dispersed their sit-ins two days ago and to renew their calls for the reinstatement of ousted president Mohamed Morsi. Young men waved open water bottles over the heads of the crowd.

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CAIRO–On the floor near the back of the al Iman mosque that today serves as a makeshift morgue, four people—three women and one man—sit cross-legged surrounded by laptops, mobile phones, and bits of paper. Yesterday, the army and police stormed the two sit-ins in support of ousted President Mohamed Morsi with tear gas, bird shot, and live ammunition. Amid the chaos and bloodshed at the Rabaa el Adaweya field hospital, Nahla el Haddad and Alaa Mustapha, ages 25 and 21 respectively, took it upon themselves to collect the names and personal belongings of the dead.

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Where Does the Muslim Brotherhood Go From Here?

Reckoning with Morsi's failure

Reckoning with Morsi's failure

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Egypt Will Erupt Again on June 30

A new day of nationwide protests is unlikely to end well

The Middle Egypt governorate of Beni Suef, an agricultural province located 70 miles south of Cairo, is an Islamist stronghold.

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ON A SULTRY MORNING in late September, I drove for two hours on the traffic-choked roads north of Cairo to Al Adwa, a Nile Delta town of dusty alleyways, mosques, and crumbling red brick houses. This is where Mohamed Morsi, the president of Egypt, was raised. Morsi left nearly four decades ago, but he returns regularly to visit his younger brothers, who still work the family farm, and to celebrate Islamic holidays.

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The Egyptian president's C.V. explains his recent actions.

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The unbearable naivete of Western defenders of the Muslim Brotherhood.

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The Syrian rebellion is exposing a dangerous contradiction in the Shia of the Middle East. Why are the victims supporting the victimizers?

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