television

"The Americans," the anti-"House of Cards"

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How to Win at 'Wheel of Fortune'

You don't need to be Arthur Chu to beat TV's other favorite gameshow

Step by step guide to showing Pat Sajak and Vanna White who's boss. 

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I went on Chinese State TV to sing and dance. The makes me and the Chinese government cringe—for different reasons.

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How "Mitt" remakes the campaign documentary. 

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Netflix's War on Mass Culture

Binge-viewing was just the beginning. Netflix has a plan to rewire our entire culture

Binge viewing was just the beginning. What you need to know to understand life after the end of mass culture.

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This piece originally appeared on newstatesman.com. Under conditions of war, a British prime minister learns that a heavily armed warship belonging to the hostile power has been detected.

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America's least-favorite city is television's favorite backdrop.

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In the our upcoming cover story, writer T.A. Frank takes a look at the new epidemic of television shows set in our nation's capital—"Homeland," "House of Cards," "Scandal," "The Americans," and "Veep"—to see what they say about power in today's Washington. Read the story online next week.    Photo illustration by Gluekit.

Television's Love Affair With John F. Kennedy

The New Republic Covers The Assassination of JFK

To read more of The New Republic's coverage of the Kennedy Assassination, click here. 

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It’s as hard to keep a longform television narrative going as it is to raise a child. Sometimes shorter forms are tempting, with old-hat conventions like climax and closure. But these longform series now have a pressing ambition to be as good as the best modern novels. That raises an awkward question: Are we watching the predicament of the characters, or the cornered rat antics of the writers?

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