Terrorism

The best 9/11 novel is a comic one

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An anthropologist studies Afghan hearts and minds, and finds something disturbing.

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As Al Qaeda suspect Abu Anas Al-Libi, who was captured recently in Libya, awaits trial before a New York federal court, military commissions for five of the U.S. military’s most high-value detainees drag on at the U.S.

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Hezbollah terrorists fleeing justice may be seeing the end of their reign of impunity in Lebanon.

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Africa's Obsession with Shopping Malls

Al Shabab attacked the perfect symbol of Kenya's rise

A year ago, a friend from rural South Africa called me full of excitement. His hometown, a large village called Burgersfort, was finally “getting on the map,” he said. I had read that the Burgersfort region had been selected to host 15 new chrome and platinum mines, a huge source of jobs in an otherwise jobs-starved country. I assumed it was the mines he meant, and congratulated him on them. But that’s not what he meant at all, he said. “We’re getting a shopping mall.”

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As fifteen U.S. embassies remain shuttered across the Middle East, it’s clear that, however successful drone strikes have been at degrading al-Qaeda’s strength, the terrorist group continues to be an adaptable and resilient foe. This past week, the Yemeni government was able to thwart an assault on its southern oil facilities by al-Qaeda forces. Though unsuccessful, the attempts demonstrate how the U.S. counter-terrorism strategy has failed to defeat the group.

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CVS, Walgreen’s and several other chains have announced they will not sell the August issue of Rolling Stone because of the cover story about Boston bomber, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. They are mainly upset about the cover, which pictures Tsarnaev as exotically attractive.

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Attorney-Client Privilege? Not at Gitmo

The perverse rules governing the September 11 trials

A decade after the U.S. captured the five accused plotters of the September 11 attack, held and allegedly tortured them in CIA "black sites," and then sent them to Guantanamo Bay, the military is still obstructing the defendants’ communications with their lawyers. At risk is the men’s fundamental right to prepare a defense.

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In 1972, they owned the skies.

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