Tina Brown

How The New Yorker Cover Became Twitter Gold

The legendary magazine alters its DNA for the Internet era

The first really talked-about New Yorker cover came nearly 70 years after the magazine’s founding. In 1992, when Tina Brown took over as just the fourth editor in its history, she broke a long-standing editorial taboo by adding three brand-name visual artists to the staff: cartoonist Art Spiegelman, illustrator Edward Sorel, and photographer Richard Avedon.

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John Gapper of The Financial Times has a story on Tina Brown which gives new meaning to the term "puff piece." The title, "Tina Brown Leaves Journalism in Her Wake," does an adequate job of summarizing the flavor of Gapper's article, which essentially views journalism as a once-noble profession that will now be without its leading light.

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The story Newsweek's demise is not just a story about Tina Brown. A 20th century historian explains why the magazine itself was so significant.

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Assessing the Newsweek editor as its print edition bites the dust.

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New York’s last romantic gets his own magazine.

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Obama’s endorsement of gay marriage on Wednesday afternoon was, first and foremost, a moment to rejoice and appreciate years of civil rights progress. But it also gave us a smaller pleasure to look forward to: opening our mailbox next week to discover how the cover of Newsweek depicts this historic occasion. Since Tina Brown became editor of the newsweekly a year ago, it has earned something of a reputation for producing attention-grabbing covers. We can imagine Brown now, sitting in her office and mulling the options.

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Princess Diana re-emerged in the news this week after a controversial Newsweek story imagined what she would be like at 50. Tina Brown speculated that, had Princess Diana survived the tragic car accident in 1997, she might have gone on to marry a “super-rich hedge fund guy,” date a “high-mindedly horny late-night talk-show host,” sue Rupert Murdoch, become friends with Prince Charles and Carole Middleton, throw herself into humanitarian causes and—of course—get Botox. Many people (including a few at TNR) reacted with horror.

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Writers should be excused their obsessions, and they should even be pardoned for writing too much about those obsessions. But Tina Brown, the editor of Newsweek, has decided to make her article on “Diana at 50” the cover story of her magazine. The piece ponders what Diana would have been doing with her life had she not died in Paris. It is almost impossible to do justice to the sheer awfulness of this story.

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When it came to the nuptials of Prince William and Kate Middleton, Tina Brown, the editor of Newsweek and The Daily Beast, truly flooded the zone. In the week of the wedding, the two publications featured an account from Brown herself of the big day; an interactive feature detailing Kate’s trajectory from commoner to princess; assessments of Kate’s dress, her sister Pippa’s dress, the hats, and the possibility that Prince Harry and Pippa might hook up; and a piece from a sex researcher analyzing what Kate and William’s balcony kiss revealed about their love life.

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One Monday morning in November, according to the admittedly rough transcript provided by the Federal News Service, “Morning Joe,” anchor Joe Scarborough spoke 3,213 words; his co-anchor Mika Brzezinski spoke just 644. Most of her words seemed merely to remind the audience that she was still awake: Yeah. Okay. Yes. No. Maybe. Right. Terrific. Scarborough dominated the meaty segments; Brzezinski piped up mainly during the transitions.

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