Eliza Gray

The Cheney Renaissance Starts in Wyoming

Dick's daughter Liz could be getting ready for a Senate run

Dick's daughter Liz could be getting ready for a Senate run.

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Roger Ailes's Border War

Can the Fox News CEO make his network more Latino-friendly?

The Fox News CEO wants more Latino viewers. His employees don’t seem to agree.

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One of the most remarked-upon aspects of the upcoming Supreme Court challenge to California’s gay-marriage ban is the odd couple leading the charge: Ted Olson and David Boies, the conservative and liberal superlawyers who squared off in 2000 in Bush v. Gore. Much less is known, however, about the old friendship between Olson and their opponent in this case, Charles Cooper, one of the many lawyers who helped Olson on Bush v. Gore. Cooper and Olson are both part of Washington’s tiny tribe of top-flight conservative litigators. Given their similar resumes, it is odd to find them on opposite sides of one of the most politically contentious Supreme Court cases of the 21st century. When Olson and Cooper face off before the court in late March, they’ll not only be debating gay rights, but the nature of conservatism itself.Cooper, known in Washington as “Chuck,” is from Alabama, and he’s best known for his starched French-cuffed shirts and genteel southern formality. His way of speaking, once described by Washington Post columnist Mary McGrory as “Victorian copy book prose,” can come across as impressive or a little unctuous, depending on the listener. If Olson, who also has a flair for oral arguments, is the lawyer who argues before the court this spring, he and Cooper will be evenly matched. 

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The new senator from South Carolina has a knack for being everything to everyone.

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Why didn't the paper cover the WikiLeaks' source's most recent hearing?

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The night after the presidential election, the news anchors on the Spanish-language network Univision,  Jorge Ramos and Maria Elena Selena, began their nightly newscast with something of a celebration. As Ramos opened the broadcast, the screen lit up with the numbers 71 and 27—the share of the Hispanic electorate that voted, respectively, for Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. The surge in Latino voting was a coup for Ramos, who is as much an immigration activist as he is a news anchor.

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After the GOP was trounced by Latino voters on Election Day—a nightmare scenario that sophisticated observers had seen coming for a long time—I called former Minnesota Senator Norm Coleman, the Chairman of the Board of the center-right American Action Network and its related organization, the Hispanic Leadership Network.

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Good news, America! Another Bush is running for office.

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In the next few weeks, the battle for marriage equality faces two crucial hurdles.

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The Humane Society is spending most of its political money this year on a single cause: Unseating Rep. Steve King.

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