Walter Mondale

It's official: Joe Biden is history's most powerful veep. Just like all the others.

READ MORE >>

Why America Never Had Universal Child Care

In 1971, a national day-care bill almost became law. Therein lies a story.

Following The New Republic's recent blockbuster day-care story, a historian describes a 1971 effort to create a national child-care program–and the backlash that ensued. 

READ MORE >>

Nearly every veep since 1976 has been the "most powerful ever."

READ MORE >>

But an increasingly diverse electorate ensures a tight race.

READ MORE >>

You shouldn't read too much into John Roberts's recent display of jurisprudence.

READ MORE >>

How did Joe Trippi end up here? Racing Karl Rove on a Segway?

READ MORE >>

Joementum

Four more years! Until Joe runs for president, that is.

READ MORE >>

One demographic has plagued Obama since his primary duel with Hillary Clinton: white voters without a college degree. Although Obama ultimately won enough white non-college voters to win the presidency in 2008, his performance was underwhelming by historic standards. And over the last four years, Obama’s already tepid support among white voters without a college degree has collapsed. At the same time, the “newer” elements of the Democratic coalition—college educated and non-white voters—have continued to offer elevated levels of support to the president.

READ MORE >>

From messaging to ad placement, campaigns make critical decisions based on demographics and geography. Indeed, coverage of campaign decision-making and the ups and downs of the horserace are incomplete without accounting for these variables. That’s why I’ll be following the evolution of the electorate and how it shapes the campaign at TNR.  Demographics aren’t quite destiny, but they’ll play an outsized role in the 2012 presidential election. The Obama campaign is counting on repeating an unprecedented performance among non-white voters.

READ MORE >>

The Republican field is crowded and fluid right now, but it won’t be for long. By January 11th, there will be at most three remaining contenders, and we’ll have a much clearer understanding of how the race will develop. There are seven candidates with a pulse, and only six of them—divided into two groups of three—are competing in Iowa. For two of the three denizens of the lower tier—Michele Bachmann and Rick Santorum—failing to finish among the top three on January 3rd would spell the effective end of their candidacies.

READ MORE >>

Pages

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR