William F. Buckley Jr.

Correspondence
May 21, 2007

UNDER SURVEILLANCESAM TANENHAUS WROTE a biography of Whittaker Chambers some years back, so presumably he knows a thing or two about treason. But, in his article about William F. Buckley Jr. and the conservative movement, he states that “Commentary has seriously proposed that the editors of The New York Times committed treason by publishing reports on the Bush administration’s domestic surveillance program” (“Athwart History,” March 14). As the author of the Commentary article in question, I would like to set Tanenhaus straight.

Bloomberg Channels Buckley
May 02, 2007

Mayor Bloomberg has received a good deal of well-deserved praise for his proposedcongestion tax, in which the city would charge drivers a fee for entering Manhattan by car during certain hours of the day.

Buckley On Iraq
May 01, 2007

From William F. Buckley Jr.'s latest column on Iraq: The political problem of the Bush administration is grave, possibly beyond the point of rescue.[Snip]It is simply untrue that we are making decisive progress in Iraq.[Snip]There are grounds for wondering whether the Republican party will survive this dilemma. Yikes. Sam Tanenhaus showed how Buckley originally turned against the war in TNR here. --Isaac Chotiner

The Southern Coup
June 19, 1995

When the new Republican Congress was sworn in last January, the South finally conquered Washington. The defeated Democratic leadership had been almost exclusively from the Northeast, the Midwest and the Pacific Northwest, with Speaker Tom Foley of Washington, Majority Leader Dick Gephardt of Missouri and Majority Whip David Bonior of Michigan in the House, and, on the Senate side, Majority Leader George Mitchell from Maine. The only Southerner in the Democratic congressional leadership was Senate Majority Whip Wendell Ford of Kentucky.

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