World Bank

This Former Johns Hopkins Professor Could Be Afghanistan's Next President
And his running mate is a brutal warlord
March 27, 2014

And he's willing to do whatever it takes—starting with his warlord running mate.

Don't Let Chuck Hagel's Hardline Israel Critics Sink His Nomination
December 18, 2012

The former Republican senator deserves a fair shot to become the next Secretary of Defense.

The Fantasy of American Government and Why People Cling to It
December 07, 2012

Governing the World: The History of an IdeaBy Mark Mazower (Penguin Press, 475 pp., $29.95)   WE HAVE PASSED, Mark Mazower writes, “from an era that had faith in the idea of international institutions to one that has lost it.” Mazower, a prolific professor of history at Columbia, has written a challenging and thought-provoking history of that arc of disillusion. We certainly have reason to be disillusioned.

Georgia’s Next Leader May Be a Billionaire Zookeeper with Albino Rapper Children
September 28, 2012

Can Bidzina Ivanishivil wrest power from President Mikheil Saakashvili next week?

Jennifer Rubin on Bob Zoellick: How To Stroke An Angry Hawk
August 09, 2012

The uproar among conservatives yesterday over alarmingly pro-health care statements by Mitt Romney and his chief spokeswoman was not the only split that emerged on the right. There was also quite a stir among conservative foreign policy mavens over the announcement that Bob Zoellick, recently retired from leading the World Bank, would be overseeing the transition for national security should Romney win in November. This set off giant alarm bells within the neo-conservative camp, which regards Zoellick as a weak-kneed "realist," not least for his conciliatory stance toward China.

Why Obama’s World Bank Pick Is Proving So Controversial
April 11, 2012

Outsiders must be a little mystified as to why the Obama administration’s nomination of Jim Young Kim to lead the World Bank has kicked up so much dust in the development community. I suspect the casual observer thinks: “Such a nice man, a doctor devoted to HIV/AIDS and to the poorest in the poorest places. Why the fuss?” But picking a new World Bank head is a little like picking a new Pope. The process isn’t just about the individual candidates for the position, but about the overall direction of the faith. And so, the controversy over Kim’s nomination is not really about Kim himself.

Jim Kim and the Problem of Excess Humility
March 28, 2012

After reading this Rolling Stone piece about Dartmouth (via Felix Salmon), I now see why the school's president, Jim Yong Kim, who Obama just tapped to head the World Bank, made such a good impression on Tim Geithner: They have very similar views on cultural humility--by which I mean how much you can impose your own values on a foreign culture.

Obama Plainly Disagrees with His World Bank Nominee
March 23, 2012

Over at The Washington Post, Jonathan Bernstein argues that the Jim Yong Kim nomination for World Bank president is (for liberals at least) a pleasant byproduct of having a Democratic president: It’s very difficult for me to imagine John McCain, had he won the presidency — or a President Mitt Romney, for that matter — reaching out beyond the usual bankers and recycled government officials to choose someone like Kim. But it’s not at all hard to picture Hillary Clinton or Joe Biden or Chris Dodd picking him. Presidents don’t make these types of picks on their own.

Meet Your New World Bank President
March 23, 2012

Lots of people can (and will) tell you about the views of Jim Yong Kim, the administration's nominee to be World Bank president, on fighting poverty and improving global health over the next few days. But the Wall Street Journal has unearthed what's sure to be the most compelling character testimonial you're going to find (fast forward till about two minutes in to get to the good stuff):  A bit painful to watch, I know, but it convinced me the guy is going to be pretty terrific in this job. I love him already. 

What The Rubinites Didn't Get About 2008
February 29, 2012

In his new book, The Escape Artists, my TNR colleague Noam Scheiber makes the interesting argument that one problem with President Obama's economic team was that, in struggling to pull the U.S. economy out of recession, the Rubinites (i.e., Tim Geithner and Larry Summers) were fighting the last war. What the financial crises of the late 1990s taught Geithner, Summers, and other members of Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin's economic team, Scheiber argues, was to embrace the Powell doctrine. Just as Colin Powell had argued that the U.S.

Pages