Mimi Dwyer

Reporter-Researcher

SXSW Grants Edward Snowden Immunity From Tough Questions

A softball interview did the leaker no favors

The leaker is granted immunity (from tough questions)

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In 2007, several n+1 editors discussed books they’d read or wished they had read in college. The series of dialogues was published in a pamphlet called What We Should Have Known. A new pamphlet, No Regrets, which came out this week, reprises the 2007 panel’s questions (What do you wish you had read in college? What books changed you?) but restricts the conversation to women.

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A story in the current issue of The New Republic focuses on the controversial doctors who have embraced an alternative-medicine approach to the treatment of football brain injuries. And no ex-player is as associated with the trend as former Cleveland Brown Bernie Kosar, who claimed that a Florida doctor's holistic techniques had cured him of chronic traumatic encephalopathy—claims the mainstream medical community rejects.

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Yesterday, Wikileaks published a draft chapter from the biggest trade agreement in years: the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a treaty between the U.S. and 11 other nations to promote free trade in the Pacific. Negotiated in secret for the past three years, the TPP covers labor regulation, health standards, the environment, and, perhaps most controversially, intellectual property—a field that the Internet has transformed but which is not yet effectively regulated internationally.

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Where Did the Anti-Globalization Movement Go?

Once the anti-globalization movement nearly shut down a city. Not anymore

They’d expected big numbers—but not so big as what came. Union organizers, environmentalists, Wiccans—45,000 people in all. Over the course of four days what had begun as a nonviolent protest at the World Trade Organization Headquarters in 1999 became the Battle in Seattle. Starbucks windows were smashed, Niketown looted.

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According to Wednesday’s Washington Examiner, the rift in the Republican Party is even apparent in where they eat, with establishment moderates and Tea Party conservatives dining at different spots. We visited these competing Capitol Hill haunts to ask employees how these beleaguered politicians behave as customers, and that’s when we learned why politicians like these places: Nobody will talk.

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On Tuesday, the New York Times came out with an exposé on the outlandish fees Detroit is paying lawyers and consultants to guide it through the biggest municipal bankruptcy in United States history. According to the Times, the city has already shelled out more than $19 million for these firms’ advice, and contract amounts could cost as much as $60.6 million.

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“Lockdown during the shutdown—what’s the next ‘down’ to happen?” an Orrin Hatch staffer joked after the Hill lockdown was lifted. “Break-it-down?”

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The word in Washington is that we’re on the brink of a “shutdown,” a dramatic term that suggests the U.S. government will cease operating—as simple as closing your laptop. The reality, of course, is much more complicated. What is a government shutdown, and how on earth could a petty budget disagreement cause it? Here’s an explanation of where shutdowns came from and how they’ve played out in the past—plus what’s likely to happen this time around. 

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