Antonin Scalia

Narrow Minded
July 09, 2008

In 2006, at the end of his first term on the Supreme Court, John Roberts told me and other journalists that his goal as chief justice would be to promote unanimity and collegiality by encouraging his fellow justices to converge around narrow decisions with few dissents. During his first term, Roberts succeeded impressively: More than half of the Court's opinions were unanimous, and only 13 percent were decided by a 5-4 vote. The polarized Supreme Court term that ended last June, however, looked very different.

The Visionary Minimalist
January 30, 2008

Toward a theory of Obama-ism.

Conservative Jurisprudence Today
June 20, 2007

This has to be among the most depressing things I've read in a while: "Jack Bauer saved Los Angeles. ... He saved hundreds of thousands of lives," Judge Scalia said. Then, recalling Season 2, where the agent's rough interrogation tactics saved California from a terrorist nuke, the Supreme Court judge etched a line in the sand. "Are you going to convict Jack Bauer?" Judge Scalia challenged his fellow judges. "Say that criminal law is against him? 'You have the right to a jury trial?' Is any jury going to convict Jack Bauer?

GOPtopia
September 11, 2006

Surry Hill. So reads a plaque at the end of the long, winding private road that leads to the crown jewel of McLean, Virginia: the 18,000-square-foot mansion that Republican lobbyist Ed Rogers and his wife Edwina call home. To get there from Washington, you drive across the Potomac River and along a parkway that, in the summer, is canopied by lush green trees. Shortly before the guarded entrance to the CIA, you turn off McLean's main road and then down a private lane, passing through brick gate posts adorned with black lanterns and into a grand cul-de-sac. A massive brick Colonial with majestic

Ante Establishment
August 28, 2006

When I came to Washington from Baltimore in 1974, I had reason to be interested in a profound question: Do Republicans make better poker players than Democrats? My $15,000 salary at the Baltimore Sun remained unchanged, but the mortgage on my new house was four times the old one. So my Friday night game, which often lasted until 6 a.m., became a matter of survival. Seven years later, I moved over to The Washington Post with a modestly improved salary, a second mortgage, brutal tuition bills, and a higher-stakes poker game.

Correspondence
February 20, 2006

SUPREME RETORT I THINK THERE IS SERIOUS CONFUSION as to what the theory of the "unitary executive" entails ("Against Alito," January 30). Justice Antonin Scalia's famous dissent in Morrison v. Olson is an example of one interpretation of the theory, which holds that executive power lies with the president, and that no "person whose actions are not fully with the supervision and control" of the president can seize it. The issue in Morrison was the law that provided for the appointment of an independent counsel.

Nice Disguise
November 14, 2005

In this 2005 piece, Andrew Siegel argues that Samuel Alito's personality makes him a more dangerous Supreme Court nominee.

Brain Trust
November 14, 2005

In 1994, the eminent evangelical historian Mark Noll wrote a scorching polemic about his own religion called The Scandal of the Evangelical Mind. The book lamented the "intellectual disaster of fundamentalism" and its toll on evangelical political and theological thought. All around him, Noll saw "a weakness for treating the verses of the Bible as pieces in a jigsaw puzzle that needed only to be sorted and then fit together to possess a finished picture of divine truth." While many evangelicals reacted angrily to Noll's description, they tacitly acknowledged his argument with their actions.

Ossification
July 25, 2005

We’ve all heard many times how Republicans are beholden to their base on social issues. But aren’t Democrats just as beholden—maybe even more beholden—to their base on social issues? Consider the way that Democrats have approached the fight over the Supreme Court vacancy. In the wake of Sandra Day O’Connor’s retirement, Democrats almost immediately settled upon a strategy of lionizing the departing justice and holding her up as a model for future appointees. This is true of elected Democratic officials.

Social Selection
July 25, 2005

We’ve all heard many times how Republicans are beholden to their base on social issues. But aren’t Democrats just as beholden—maybe even more beholden—to their base on social issues? Consider the way that Democrats have approached the fight over the Supreme Court vacancy. In the wake of Sandra Day O’Connor’s retirement, Democrats almost immediately settled upon a strategy of lionizing the departing justice and holding her up as a model for future appointees. This is true of elected Democratic officials.

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