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What Blagojevich Owes Burris
December 31, 2008

Ben Joravsky is the author of Hoop Dreams and a staff writer for the Reader newspaper in Chicago. It's only appropriate that Governor Rod Blagojevich appoint Roland Burris to fill Barack Obama's vacant senate seat. After all, Blago owes his governorship to Burris. To understand, you have to return to 2002, when no one in the country was paying attention to politics in our goofy little fiefdom, and Blagojevich was running for governor in the Democratic primary.

Two Speeches And Two Attempts To Reach Our Better Angels
November 05, 2008

David Kusnet was chief speechwriter for former President Bill Clinton from 1992-1994. He is the author of Love the Work, Hate the Job: Why America’s Best Workers Are Unhappier than Ever.

The Death Of A Cartoonist
October 09, 2008

Cathy Young is contributing editor of Reason magazine and author of Growing Up in Moscow: Memories of a Soviet Girlhood. The death of Soviet political cartoonist Boris Yefimov on October 1, largely unnoticed in the West, was not quite the end of an era--Yefimov's era ended long ago--but the end of a life that, Zelig-like, was involved in every transition of the last century of Russian history. More than a century, in fact: Yefimov (born Boris Yefimovich Friedland, in Kiev in 1899) was 109 years old when he died. As a boy, he watched Russia's last Czar Nicholas II go by in a coach.

Ornstein On The Economy's Moral Hazard Meltdown
October 08, 2008

Norman Ornstein is a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and the author of The Broken Branch: How Congress Is Failing America and How to Get It Back on Track, with Thomas E. Mann. Two key words have been largely missing from the debate over our financial crisis: moral hazard. Moral hazard is a concept used by economists for situations where no adverse consequences flow from risky behavior or failure; and where wrongheaded risky behavior that goes unpunished begets even more wrongheaded risky behavior. Investment in a market system is supposed to balance risk and reward.

McCain: Channeling Dole More Than Ever
October 08, 2008

David Kusnet was chief speechwriter for former President Bill Clinton from 1992 to 1994. He is the author of Love the Work, Hate the Job: Why America's Best Workers Are Unhappier than Ever.

Obama Finally Flashes Some Charm
October 08, 2008

Alan Brinkley is the provost and a professor of history at Columbia University, as well as a National Book Award-winning author.  I really don't like "town hall meeting" debates. First, they are (in this context) populist gimmicks to test a skill that has nothing to do with being president.

Steven Pinker On How America Will Change
October 05, 2008

In an effort to start making sense of what is an indisputably confusing situation, we asked some of the most thoughtful people we know the question: How will America change as a result of the economic downturn? Here's Steven Pinker, Johnstone Professor of Psychology at Harvard and the author of The Stuff of Thought.   Many leftist commentators have gleefully interpreted the financial crisis as proof of the failure of free-market capitalism. Libertarianism and laissez-faire will be out; regulatory command-and-control will be in.

Hype And Fear In The News
September 30, 2008

David Cay Johnston, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his innovative coverage of our tax system, retired this year as a investigative reporter for The New York Times.

Celebrating The Bailout Bill's Failure--and Looking Ahead
September 29, 2008

David Cay Johnston, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his innovative coverage of our tax system, retired this year as a investigative reporter for The New York Times.

Alan Brinkley On Last Night's Debate
September 27, 2008

Alan Brinkley is the provost and a professor of history at Columbia University, as well as a National Book Award-winning author. I doubt the first debate will make a decisive difference. There were no "There you go again" moments and no terrible blunders. Both candidates stuck to their talking points, and there was nothing very new about the debate other than the opportunity to contrast the two men more vividly than has been possible before. On the substance, I think Obama won, but not by much. He had a crisp and effective answer to the key question about the economy.

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