Bob Dole

When Personal Is Political
January 13, 2010

Harold Pollack is the Helen Ross Professor of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago and a Special Correspondent for The Treatment. I recently did a Curbside Consult with deputy drug czar Tom McLellan. I hope that you read it, because he had important things to say about medical marijuana, the need to critically evaluate supply-side interdiction, and many other things. I disagree with of his views. I am more open to harm reduction approaches to the serious problem of opiate overdose. I have a more permissive views regarding marijuana policy.

When Personal Is Political
January 13, 2010

Harold Pollack is a professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration and Special Correspondent for The Treatment. I recently did a Curbside ConsultI hope that you read it, because he had important things to say about medical marijuana, the need to critically evaluate supply-side interdiction, and many other things. I disagree with of his views. I am more open to harm reduction approaches to the serious problem of opiate overdose. I have a more permissive views regarding marijuana policy.

No Exit
October 05, 2009

The never-ending lunacy of Betsy McCaughey.

Party Is Such Sweet Sorrow
September 04, 2009

Even before Ted Kennedy lost his battle with brain cancer late last month, Republicans were suggesting that health care reform had suffered in his absence--not because Kennedy was so devoted to the cause, but because he would have cut a deal with the Republicans. “In every case, he fought as hard as he could . . .

The Danger of Rejecting Compromises
September 03, 2009

Earlier this year, a group of former Senate Majority Leaders--Howard Baker and Bob Dole, along with Tom Daschle--released a template for bipartisan health reform. They did so through the Bipartisan Policy Center, which they'd established along with George Mitchell (who subsequently left to join the Obama administration). The reaction from liberals was lukewarm, at best. And I shared the ambivalence.

The Siren Song Of Bob Dole Is Heard Again
August 14, 2009

In 1993 and 1994, Bob Dole masterfully used the chimera of bipartisanship to defeat health care reform. While opposing President Clinton's reform plan, he co-sponsored his own alternative that he used to paint Clinton as too liberal. When Clinton's planfinally died, Dole renounced support for his own plan, so that nothing at all happened. Then Republicans took control of Congress and made no effort whatsoever to reform health care. Now Dole's at it again! Here he is in today's Washington Post: "Maybe we can't solve it all this year.

Your Health Care System: A Map
July 01, 2009

If you're trying to pin down a moment from 1994 when the fate of the Clinton health care plan was sealed, you could do worse than January 25. On that night, then-Senator Bob Dole responded to the president's State of the Union address. Clinton had hoped to use the speech to help sell his proposal; Dole used his response to help kill it. And he did it primarily not through what he said, but what he showed on camera. Dole brought with him a chart, depicting how American health care would work if the Clinton plan came into effect. And it was not a pretty picture. Lines were all over the place.

An Argument For Bipartisanship, Worth Taking Seriously
June 21, 2009

In the world of liberal commentary, fans of bipartisanship were hard to find last week. With Republican opposition threatening to hold up legislation in both Senate committees writing health reform, writers urged Democrats to strike out on their own and, if necessary, to pass legislation on a straight, party-line vote. E.J. Dionne may have put it best: Where did we get the idea that the only good health-care bill is a bipartisan bill? Is bipartisanship more important than whether a proposal is practical and effective?

What Actual Bipartisanship Looks Like
June 17, 2009

Is it important to make health care legislation bipartisan? You can't answer that question without knowing what bipartisan health care would look like. And thanks to a quartet of former senators, we now have some idea. Sort of. For the last year, Howard Baker, Tom Daschle, Bob Dole, and George Mitchell have been working to hammer out a common health reform vision through what's called the Bipartisan Policy Center. (Mitchell dropped out when he joined the administration.) Assisting them in this effort were two of the top health policy minds from each party, Mark McClellan and Chris Jennings.

Tough Reid
April 15, 2009

Is the majority leader a partisan or pushover?

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