Books

Jeanne's Way
March 26, 2008

Madame Proust: A Biography By Evelyne Bloch-Dano Translated by Alice Kaplan (University of Chicago Press, 310 pp., $27.50) IT HAS NEVER BEEN CLEAR what, if anything, should be made of the fact that Proust's mother was a Jew. This genealogical fact means that in the patently irrelevant terms of Jewish law, he, too, could be called a Jew, while in the equally irrelevant terms of biology he was half-Jewish.

The Troubadour Intellectual
March 26, 2008

Alfred Kazin: A Biography By Richard M. Cook (Yale University Press, 452 pp., $35) I. Alfred Kazin had one great, abiding subject. He wanted to tell the world what it felt like to become a writer in mid-century America. In three autobiographical volumes published over a period of a quartercentury, he dug so deep into his own life story, which had begun in hardscrabble Brooklyn and climaxed in the glamorous Manhattan of the 1960s, that he managed to tell the story of an entire generation.

A Noble Career
March 26, 2008

Margaret Fuller: An American Romantic Life Volume II: The Public Years By Charles Capper (Oxford University Press, 649 pp., $40) LIKE WALT WHITMAN, her slightly younger contemporary, Margaret Fuller was one to contain multitudes. No American woman of the pre-Civil War era--and no European woman of the era--wrote so brilliantly about so many things, while living so intently and intensely. For that matter, you would be hard put to think of a man who equaled Fuller's range of literary, intellectual, and political accomplishments.

The Jewish King Lear: A Comedy in America
March 12, 2008

Translated by Ruth Gay (Yale University Press, 192 pp., $32.50) I.For as long as I remember, my father took a lively interest in how many people showed up at the funerals of his friends and acquaintances, most of them members of the synagogue where he served as president or of the many Jewish organizations with which he ceaselessly busied himself. "Mollie," he would say with excitement when he returned from the funeral parlor, "you should have seen Stanetsky's this afternoon.

Beauty's Law
March 12, 2008

The Flowers of EvilBy Charles BaudelaireTranslated by Keith Waldrop(Wesleyan University Press, 196 pp, $24.95)I.Just over one hundred fifty years ago, in the summer of 1857, Charles Baudelaire published Les Fleurs du mal, his first collection of poems. The book's fate in France is well known. Of the few critics who reviewed it, most were dismissive. Some called the poems obscene.

Night Song of a Wandering Shepherd in Asia
March 12, 2008

What are you doing, moon, up in the sky;what are you doing, tell me, silent moon?You rise at night and go,observing the deserts. Then you set.Aren't you ever tiredof plying the eternal byways?Don't you get bored? Do you still wantto look down on these valleys?The shepherd's lifeis like your life.He rises at first light,moves his flock across the fields, and seessheep, springs, and grass,then, weary, rests at evening,and hopes for nothing more.Tell me, moon, what goodis the shepherd's life to himor yours to you?

Discipline and Decline
March 12, 2008

Iron Kingdom: The Rise and Downfall of Prussia, 1600-1947 By Christopher Clark (Harvard University Press, 776 pp., $35) On his way back from self-imposed exile in Paris, in 1844, Heinrich Heine caught a first glimpse of Prussian soldiers in Aachen, a city in the far west corner of Germany: I wandered about in this dull little nest For about an hour or more Saw Prussian military once again They looked much the same as before. [ ...

Howl, Howl, Howl!
March 12, 2008

The Jewish King Lear: A Comedy in America By Jacob Gordin Translated by Ruth Gay (Yale University Press, 192 pp., $32.50) I. For as long as I remember, my father took a lively interest in how many people showed up at the funerals of his friends and acquaintances, most of them members of the synagogue where he served as president or of the many Jewish organizations with which he ceaselessly busied himself. "Mollie," he would say with excitement when he returned from the funeral parlor, "you should have seen Stanetsky's this afternoon.

The Mythmaker
March 12, 2008

Arthur Conan Doyle: A Life in LettersBy Jon Lellenberg, Daniel Stashower, and Charles Foley(Penguin Press, 706 pp., $37.95)   This is a book devoted to a versatile and almost entirely forgotten writer. He wrote lively historical novels set in the middle ages, or in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. He wrote plays and poems and at least one novel of modern life that was thought somewhat risque. He also wrote light sketches about three children called (alas) Laddie, Dimples, and Baby.

Apparition
March 12, 2008

I saw a white angel passing over my head;Its dazzling flight pacified the stormAnd lulled from a distance the noisy sea."What have you come to do, angel, in this night?"I asked. It answered, "I come to take your soul."And I was afraid, because I saw it was a woman;And I said, trembling and holding out my arms,"What will be left of me? Because you will fly away."The angel did not respond. The shadow-besieged skyWas turning dark. "If you take my soul," I cried,"Where will you take it? Show me in what place."Still there was silence. "O traveler of the blue sky,Are you death?" I said.

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