The Brits

The long and complicated relationship between the British royal family and the press.

READ MORE >>

Here at the Metro Program we have long advocated a “bottom-up” approach to economic development.  Such an approach calls for a major reorientation of federal-state-metro relationships--one that empowers metros and regions with real flexibility and resources so as to enable them to chart their own courses. And so we have often looked abroad for ideas as we have worked on concepts, such as Metropolitan Business Plans (coming soon: Metropolitan Export Plans) and our proposals for aiding and abetting the self-organized initiatives of innovation clusters. For example, we have closely followed devel

READ MORE >>

Republicans have endlessly recirculated the completely misleading talking point that President Obama in 2009 spoke dismissively about American exceptionalism.

READ MORE >>

[Guest post by Isaac Chotiner] Mike Huckabee, who has been praised for his curt dismissal of the birthers, had this to say in a radio interview: “One thing that I do know is his having grown up in Kenya, his view of the Brits, for example, very different than the average American,” Huckabee said in response.

READ MORE >>

Stuff of Legend

Has the United States always been an exceptionally free and virtuous nation? If you have to ask the question, you are already well on the road to unpatriotic perdition—or so every Republican about to run for president seems to think. “Don’t kid yourself with the lie,” Rick Santorum recently told a group of college Republicans.

READ MORE >>

Just over 45 years ago, I set foot in the United States for the first time. If you had sat the old Oxford scholarship exam in December and, in Simon Gray’s deathless definition of the pedagogical process, displayed a fluent fraudulence that the examiners could not expose without revealing their own fraudulence, you were able to take the next nine months off before going up as a freshman in October. So, “westward, look, the land is bright!”—a line Churchill liked to quote—and I set off to the New World, more precisely, to Chuck Berry’s ‘Promised Land’ of southern California.

READ MORE >>

For all of the excitement surrounding the UK’s general election, its main players have been deeply evasive on the nation’s central question: What to do about the massive fiscal imbalance they’re staring at? Here is how the respected Institute for Fiscal Studies begins its quietly scathing analysis: “The financial crisis and the recession have prompted a huge increase in government borrowing over the last two years, as the gap between what the public sector spends and raises from taxes has widened to an extent not seen since the Second World War.

READ MORE >>

There were moments--long moments--during the Iraq war when I had my doubts. Even deep doubts. Frankly, I couldn’t quite imagine any venture like this in the Arab world turning out especially well. This is, you will say, my prejudice. But some prejudices are built on real facts, and history generally proves me right. Go ahead, prove me wrong. Of course, Iraq hasn’t turned out that well. Sunni jihadniks are still routinely murdering pious Shi’a on pilgrimage to Karbala.

READ MORE >>

“Copacetic.” “Fine and dandy,” says the Webster's New International. Textured origins can be found in the Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang, American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language and the various Oxfords. Mixed origins, actually, from the black South, Creole French, Harlem jazz, Italian and Hebrew/Yiddish. The last pairing points to a Hebrew phrase, “kol b'tsedek,” “all with justice.” I've never heard this phrase, and I don't believe it's the secret behind "copacetic" for a moment.

READ MORE >>

Worth Reading

Meredith Whitney predicts predatory lending will rise. The Brits look to charge a super-tax of 50+% on banker bonuses. Tyler Cowen on how universities might actually start to value teaching prowess. Paul Volcker has serious doubts about the benefits of financial innovation. But Eugene Fama concludes that innovation "should be a good thing." Is there a link between monetary policy and risk-taking?

Pages

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR