Georgetown

[Guest post by Darius Tahir] Want to know whether health care reform will really reduce health care spending? Then pay close attention to what’s happening with a new regulation designed to reconfigure the way we pay doctors and hospitals. As any card-carrying health care wonk can tell you, the root of all evil (or at least a lot of evil) in our health care system is “fee-for-service” reimbursement. That’s the most common way that we pay for medical care in this country: By paying the provider of that care for every service rendered. So an office visit is one charge.

READ MORE >>

Welcome to TNR’s 2011 List Issue. In putting the issue together, we had one major priority: to avoid creating a power list featuring anyone who regularly dominates headlines. Instead, we had a different idea: What if we revealed something about D.C. by documenting who quietly wields power? From there, we began to hatch other ideas for lists, and we realized that—while they can certainly be cheap gimmicks—lists can also convey a lot about a city. Below is the first list from the issue: Washington’s most powerful, least famous people.

READ MORE >>

The Washington Post's "Reliable Source" gossip column today makes an educated guess that the restaurant where Iranian plotters planned to blow up the Saudi ambassador was Cafe Milano in Georgetown.

READ MORE >>

They rolled out of Washington in the dead of night. But the Huntsman bus was wide-awake. A group of around 50 young Jon Huntsman supporters had hit the road, heading up to Liberty State Park, New Jersey, to see the former ambassador announce his dark-horse candidacy. Like the campaign itself, the pilgrimage had been cobbled together at the last minute. The young volunteers had gotten word only a few days in advance and had scrambled to fill buses from D.C. and Philadelphia. Stephen, a Huntsman organizer with a Utah basketball jersey draped over his button-down, handed out bagels.

READ MORE >>

Going Rogue

As everyone knows, the health care reform lawsuits that are currently making their way to the Supreme Court are being shepherded and applauded by conservatives. But how conservative is the judicial philosophy behind the suits? The answer turns out to be complicated. In fact, once the lawsuits end up at the Court, they will likely expose ideological fissures in the conservative legal movement that may unsettle those on both the right and the left. To understand why, consider what these lawsuits are actually about.

READ MORE >>

A Princeton-Georgetown final. Ah, memories:

The Unnecessary Fall

A counter-history of the Obama presidency.

READ MORE >>

The Breakup

Did Obama just dump his best friend on Wall Street?

READ MORE >>

On the surface, it seems as if tomorrow's Egyptian elections will be a dreary formality. Although the official campaigning period for the Shura Council, Egypt’s upper house of parliament, has been going for two weeks, the streets of Cairo are noticeably silent. The only overt evidence of political gamesmanship is the paraphernalia of the ruling party’s candidates plastered in the city’s central squares. Campaigns here tend to be lackluster because they don't usually matter.

READ MORE >>

Specter of Defeat

Just over a year ago, Democratic Congressman Joe Sestak was seriously weighing a Senate bid in Pennsylvania against then-Republican Arlen Specter, but he wanted one last word of sage advice. So he called up his former boss, Bill Clinton, for whom he’d served as director for defense policy on the National Security Council, and, according to Sestak, “he invited me over to sit down with him over at his home in Georgetown.” But the meeting didn’t go exactly as planned. “Just as I walked in,” Sestak says, “an aide came up and said, ‘Did you hear?

READ MORE >>

Pages

SHARE HIGHLIGHT

0 CHARACTERS SELECTED

TWEET THIS

POST TO TUMBLR