Houston

A Blue Texas? Keep Dreaming

All this talk about Texas turning blue anytime soon is a bit premature.

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Nixon's suburban strategy isn't going to cut it for Republicans in 2016.

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It's time to recap the most memorable moments of the 2012 campaign.

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The Oklahoma City Thunder broke up their core by trading James Harden to the Houston Rockets. It will turn out well for everyone, including the fans.

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A new poll shows Obama up by 2 points in Arizona, but could Obama really win the state?

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Dinesh D'Souza obsession with Obama's "anti-colonialism" is translating to some surprisingly good box office numbers.

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In 1951 the United States government responded to nuclear testing in the Soviet Union by scaring schoolchildren half to death with a short educational film called Duck And Cover. The film is roundly mocked today, but it’s a model of practical advice compared to Run. Hide. Fight. (see below), a short educational film funded with a $200,000 grant from the Department of Homeland Security and produced by the Houston mayor’s office.

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In 1951 the United States government responded to nuclear testing in the Soviet Union by scaring schoolchildren half to death with a short educational film called Duck And Cover. The film is roundly mocked today, but it's a model of practical advice compared to Run. Hide. Fight., a short educational film funded with a $200,000 grant from the Department of Homeland Defense and produced by the Houston mayor's office.

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Mitt Romney’s appearance at the NAACP convention in Houston was the occasion for much media tittering—after all, the candidate’s prior attempts to ingratiate himself with African-Americans had produced some awkward moments. The speech did not disappoint in the awkwardness department — Romney opened with a cringe-worthy line of praise for the convention’s organ music, and the same organ later tried to prematurely usher him off the stage, like a verbose Oscar recipient.

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The architect Renzo Piano is unpredictable. He has designed museums of extraordinary beauty and refinement, from the Menil Collection in Houston to a recent addition at the Art Institute of Chicago. And he has produced work that is downright bombastic, especially the Broad Contemporary Art Museum in Los Angeles, done around the same time as his work for Chicago. What attracts so many different clients to Piano is the sophisticated yet playful feeling for intervals, proportions, and materials that he brings to the cool geometric forms of mid-twentieth-century modernism.

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