Kimberly Strassel

A decade ago, when Congress was debating the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act, better known as McCain-Feingold, the conservative alternative to its modest tightening of regulations on political spending bore the wonderful name DeLay-Doolittle. The name represented not just the two primary sponsors—then-Reps. Tom DeLay and John Doolittle—but also what the bill would do, or not.

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One of the rewards of being a loyal Wall Street Journal subscriber is that one gets to read things one might not see anywhere else.

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California's 36th district recently held a special election to replace retiring Rep. Jane Harman. The district hed a "jungle primary," in which candidates from both parties all run on the same ballot. Wall Street Journal opinion columnist Kimberly Strassel wants to know why nobody is investing this with the same significance as Kathy Hochul's surprise win in the New York special election: In May, when Democrats pulled out a surprise victory in a special House election in New York, all the talk was about Medicare lessons for Republicans.

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The Republican Party's fascinating and apparently suicidal reaction to the Paul Ryan budget continues to accelerate.

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Wall Street Journal editorial page columnist Kimberly Strassel lays out the next parts of the Affordable Care Act that Republicans will attack: If the GOP is to dismember ObamaCare, it must pressure Democrats into helping. That's what Republicans did this week. Next up for debate will be other odious elements: the individual mandate, taxes on kids' braces, restrictions on health savings accounts, cuts to Medicare. The GOP will highlight each one and then ask 2012 Democrats what they are willing to defend. What holds these elements together?

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Wall Street Journal opinion columnist Kimberly Strassel has a column entitled "Why Democrats Can't Win On Taxes," purporting to show that the awesome power of (massively unpopular) tax cuts for the rich has put the Democrats into a political bind. Oddly, in the course of running down the party's alternatives in an attempt to prove her point, she winds up with this final option: The Democrats' best shot is procedural, to somehow allow only one vote—on extending rates for just the "middle class"—and dare Republicans to vote against it.

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As a longtime fan of the Wall Street Journal editorial page's promiscuous use of scare quotes, I enjoyed this passage in today's column by Kimberly Strassel: So it only aids the White House when "anonymous" Republican members—annoyed that they must have this debate—gripe to the press that Mr.

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