Ron Fournier

Ron Fournier, a Baby Boomer writing in the Atlantic, is worried about what will happen when millenials are in charge of the political world. "[T]hey have no patience for inefficiency, stodgy institutions or the status quo." This is, apparently, a bad thing. "Consider what they could do to politics and government," he warns direly. 

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His biggest boosters, a coterie of Wall Street conservatives, have lost their love.

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Obama's Worst Line

For a political speech, Obama's address was so free of cliche that it had almost no outright cringers. But it did have one: I suppose the politically safe thing would be to move on from this episode and just hope that it fades into the woodwork. Obama does this a lot -- remind people he is no ordinary candidate, he refuses to take the easy way, and so forth. He really ought to lose this overt theme. It contributes, however infinitesimally, to the perception Ron Fournier articulated that he's more arrogant than the average pol.

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I've always thought of the AP's Ron Fournier as a smart but pretty even-tempered and conventional political reporter. But he really, really seems to hate Mitt Romney.

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AP's Ron Fournier tackles the question. I think the critiques of what Fournier calls the "three Hs" ("haircut, house and hedge fund") are pretty bogus. It's the cautious-moderate-to-lefty-crusader evolution that I wonder about. P.S. Ben Smith on a big letdown for Edwards--no SEIU endorsement (for now). Update: Brendan Nyhan takes a rather dim view of Fournier's analysis. --Michael Crowley

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