Stockholm

What will happen to the seven paintings—including artworks by Claude Monet, Pablo Picasso, and Henry Matisse—that were stolen from the Kunsthal Museum in Rotterdam last week? Some think the artworks will be sold to shady dealers. Others hypothesize the stolen paintings will be traded in the illicit drugs or arms market. Or maybe these paintings will end up with an evil collector. (That scenario probably owes its popularity to Dr.

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The Deleted WorldBy Tomas TranströmerVersions by Robin Robertson (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 41 pp., $13) The Great Enigma: New Collected PoemsBy Tomas TranströmerTranslated by Robin Fulton (New Directions, 262 pp., $17.95) Thirty-six years ago, I wrote that Tomas Tranströmer’s verses were “poems of an almost prehistoric sort, with their severe music and their archaic austerity of language.” Thirteen years ago, reviewing the New Collected Poems, I reported the common opinion concerning the Swedish poet—that “Tranströmer is frequently, and justly, mentioned as a poet deserving the [Nobel] priz

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“Tranströmer!” Of course, I knew immediately what the email message meant. After years of waiting among the also-rans, and amid speculation that this was the year for an Arab poet to win the Nobel Prize in Literature to honor the Arab Spring, or maybe, a late-breaking rumor, that Bob Dylan was the bettors’ choice, a Swede was named to win the Swedish prize.

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On December 12, 2010, a suicide bombing was committed in central Stockholm by an Islamic terrorist who denounced the Swedish government for its “foolish support for the pig Vilks.” Vilks was the conceptual artist who had, in 2007, depicted the Prophet Muhammad as a “roundabout dog,” familiar to tourists as a street display in Sweden.

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Left fifteenth floor an hour ago. Still snow, third of April Of the year, moss-agate still. Will try to will myself To sleep. Magical thoughts move intravenously in hospital, And there is also harm beyond my own imagination’s gift For clemency. Turned one hematite-dark square In the Unresponsive Blood Ward, one rose angle past             Denial looking at his torso bare. North of Stockholm, in a dulled medieval painting Nearly primitive, a feudal lord is playing chess with bony Death (come, of course, to take our marrow’s lives). File Or rank, I would be the chalkstone rook.

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The Fortunate Journey

The Escorial: Art and Power in the Renaissance By Henry Kamen (Yale University Press, 291 pp., $35) The historian Henry Kamen has spent a distinguished career presenting what he calls a “revisionist” history of early modern Spain.

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The Stranger From Within

William Golding: The Man Who Wrote Lord of the Flies By John Carey (Free Press, 573 pp., $32.50) The publishing history of Lord of the Flies reads like a fairy tale. In 1953, more than half a century ago, a grubby, dog-eared manuscript that had made the rounds (and of which only the first twenty or so pages had received serious attention) arrived at the office of Faber & Faber, the most distinguished literary publisher in London.

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The Stranger From Within

William Golding: The Man Who Wrote Lord of the Flies By John Carey (Free Press, 573 pp., $32.50) The publishing history of Lord of the Flies reads like a fairy tale. In 1953, more than half a century ago, a grubby, dog-eared manuscript that had made the rounds (and of which only the first twenty or so pages had received serious attention) arrived at the office of Faber & Faber, the most distinguished literary publisher in London.

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Planet Doom

For most of the 2.5 million years that humans and their predecessors have been around, the Earth has been a volatile place. Subtle shifts in the planet’s orbit have triggered large temperature swings; glaciers have marched across North America and Europe and then retreated. But, about 10,000 years ago, something unusual happened: The Earth’s climate settled into a relatively stable state, global temperatures started hovering within a narrow band, and sea levels stopped rising and falling so drastically.

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It's fairly straightforward to measure how much carbon dioxide a given country is emitting within its own borders. Just count the factories and power plants and cars and so forth and tally up all that pollution. But what about outsourced emissions? After all, the United States and Europe consume a whole bunch of goods manufactured overseas, and those emissions usually get chalked up to developing countries like China. So who bears the responsibility here? It's a dicey question, though the first step is to get a handle on how much carbon pollution actually gets outsourced.

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