Teddy Roosevelt

Teddy Roosevelt, Not-So-Great Reformer

What Washington-focused liberals miss about Progressivism

The liberal consensus is that Teddy Roosevelt was a great progressive. But his popularity makes it hard to see an alternative: progressivism with power not in the hands of corporate managers, or oligarchs. 

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A note from Chris Hughes about The New Republic's relaunch on January 28th.

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PETA is right to say that Pokémon endorses animal cruelty--though, in typical fashion, it misses the point

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In his speech last Tuesday in Osawatomie, Kansas, President Obama initiated a new campaign to pressure Senate Republicans to drop their filibuster against Consumer Financial Protection Bureau nominee Richard Cordray and actually vote on his confirmation.

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The GOP vs. TR

One of the reasons that it was clever for Obama to give his Dec.

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Ever since Rick Perry declared his candidacy, Bachmann has struggled to emerge from his shadow. Once the undisputed craziest candidate who had a plausible shot at the nomination, the congresswoman from Minnesota has suddenly had to contend with a remarkable string of wacky revelations from her Texan opponent. One thing is clear: Between the two of them, there’s more craziness than Ron Paul fans at a straw poll. But who’s the most off-the-wall?

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When the Spanish-American War of 1898 ended with a victory for the United States, John Hay, U.S. ambassador in London, felt moved to celebrate. In a letter to Teddy Roosevelt, he described it as a war “begun with the highest motives, carried on with magnificent intelligence and spirit, favored by the fortune which loves the brave.” It was, in short, “a splendid little war.” The fall of the Qaddafi regime in Libya has inclined many contemporary commentators to similarly effusive bursts of cheer. But does the war in Libya deserve all the praise being bestowed upon it?

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Imagine a new liberal policy magazine in which the word “Obama” appears only five times in 75 pages, and phrases like, “Obama should have …” or “Obama’s big mistake was …” never.

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The Real McCoy

For a political party that seems to derive its ideology from Ayn Rand’s embrace of heedless ambition, the Republicans are going through an unexpected Ferdinand the Bull phase. Many of the GOP’s top presidential prospects prefer smelling the flowers—or taking a New Jersey state helicopter to a son’s baseball game—to becoming Teddy Roosevelt’s man in the arena, scrapping for every vote in the Iowa caucuses. And while Mitt Romney and Tim Pawlenty long for the roar of the crowd, Republican voters are caught up in the allure of the non-combatant.

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Lost Generation

Asked on election eve to assess the significance of the coming Democratic defeat, Tim Kaine, the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, tried to portray this election as fairly typical.

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