International Monetary Fund

Don't Let Chuck Hagel's Hardline Israel Critics Sink His Nomination
December 18, 2012

The former Republican senator deserves a fair shot to become the next Secretary of Defense.

The Fantasy of American Government and Why People Cling to It
December 07, 2012

Governing the World: The History of an IdeaBy Mark Mazower (Penguin Press, 475 pp., $29.95)   WE HAVE PASSED, Mark Mazower writes, “from an era that had faith in the idea of international institutions to one that has lost it.” Mazower, a prolific professor of history at Columbia, has written a challenging and thought-provoking history of that arc of disillusion. We certainly have reason to be disillusioned.

Sanctions Have Crippled Iran’s Economy, But They’re Not Working
November 12, 2012

Sanctions aren't only going to deny Iranians health, education, and hope for the future. They'll feed new grievances against the U.S.

Georgia’s Next Leader May Be a Billionaire Zookeeper with Albino Rapper Children
September 28, 2012

Can Bidzina Ivanishivil wrest power from President Mikheil Saakashvili next week?

Metro Areas Vary Amid Slowing Global Growth
July 18, 2012

Earlier this week, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) lowered its growth forecast for the global economy for this year and next. It seems that both developed and developing countries are going to expand more slowly than expected earlier this year. In a pattern also seen in 2011, the United States is experiencing a loss of momentum and the Eurozone countries are still stuck in a sovereign debt quagmire.

What Do Greeks Really Want? Meet the Voters of the Country’s Extremist Parties
May 09, 2012

Athens, Greece—The big winners of Greece’s election this week were parties far removed from the political center. From the leftist SYRIZA, which came in second place with 17 percent of the vote, to the far-right Independent Greeks, who ended up with 11 percent, and the racist extremists of Golden Dawn, who gained 7 percent, the non-mainstream parties received an alarmingly large share of the total vote. What’s less clear, however, is what the vote tallies mean. Were they simply a reflection of anger against the ruling parties that have presided over the country’s current economic freefall?

The Visionary
May 04, 2012

If you were to pinpoint one moment when it looked as if things just might work out for Salam Fayyad, the Palestinian prime minister, it would probably be February 2, 2010. That day, Fayyad addressed the annual Herzliya Conference, a sort of Israeli version of Davos featuring high-powered policymakers and intellectuals. It is not a typical speaking venue for Palestinians; yet Fayyad was warmly received.

The Galling Misuse Of The German Example
April 25, 2012

I don’t usually wade into global economic policy here on the Stump, but as Mitt Romney reminded us in his speech last night, the 2012 presidential race is “still about the economy—and we’re not stupid.” So after coming across a particular pet peeve of mine just now, I’m going to wade on in. In its lead editorial today, the Wall Street Journal pushes back at the broadening ranks urging Germany to loosen up on its austerity mantra for Europe. I’m not going to get into that fight now—I figure this guy’s got it under control.

A Brief Audit of Politicians’ Tax Problems
April 17, 2012

If you’re still filling out your tax forms, it may be tempting to cut some corners and tell a few white lies. But as the ethics-deficient politicians listed below can tell you, tax evasion doesn’t end well. Here’s a guide on “what-not-to-do,” courtesy of political figures, past and present.  Spiro Agnew. The only vice president to resign due to criminal charges, Agnew left office in 1973 just ten months before Richard Nixon’s departure would have made him president.

Hungary’s Prime Minister Bites the Hand that Feeds Him
March 26, 2012

On March 15, Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán stood before nearly 100,000 of his fellow countrymen in Budapest and declared, “Hungarians will not live as foreigners dictate.” Drawing an explicit connection between the European Union, which Hungary enthusiastically joined in 2004, and the Soviet Union, which brutally crushed a Hungarian revolt in 1956, Orbán said, “We are more than familiar with the character of unsolicited comradely assistance, even if it comes wearing a finely tailored suit and not a uniform with shoulder patches.” This style of demagoguery is nothing new for Orbán.

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