Prince

Did Prince Trick His Gen X Fans?
March 14, 2013

Touré's new book claims that Prince was little more than a pied piper for evangelical Christianity.

Baudrillard and Babes at the Consumer Electronics Show
The surreal magic of the annual gadget extravaganza in Las Vegas
January 18, 2013

At the annual gadget-industry trade show, Lydia DePillis finds blink-controlled TVs, angry tech bloggers, and a World’s Fair for an age when brands are more important than countries.

Why Blue State Votes May Matter This Year
October 26, 2012

Every year, we hear people in solidly-blue states complaining that their votes don't count. But this year, they do.

How Paul Ryan Convinced Washington of His Genius
September 14, 2012

Paul Ryan's rise from fitness instructor to philosopher prince.

Disco and Dinosaurs in L.A.’s Contemporary Art World
September 06, 2012

Reading about the latest controversy at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles—the apparently forced resignation of the longtime head curator Paul Schimmel over the pop-culture exhibitions that the new director Jeffrey Deitch is bringing to the museum—I experienced my usual feelings of disbelief.

Whiff-Whaff
July 12, 2012

ASK WHO IS THE most charismatic Conservative in Britain right now, and the answer will come straight back: Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson, once shadow minister for the arts, now mayor of London, columnist for The Daily Telegraph, comic turn-taker, and coquette. And soon to be leader of the Tory Party? Not according to him.

History as Fantasy
March 29, 2012

Vanished Kingdoms: The Rise and Fall of States and NationsBy Norman Davies (Viking, 830 pp., $40)  There is a well-worn story that is told in one form or another in all European history textbooks. In 824, ten years after the death of Charlemagne, Agobard, Archbishop of Lyon, hailed a new Christian imperial ambition to unite all the peoples and lands of the Western Holy Roman Empire by reformulating Galatians 3:28: “There is now neither Gentile nor Jew, Scythian nor Aquitanian, nor Lombard, nor Burgundian, nor Alaman, nor bond, nor free.

The Pretender
November 09, 2011

Many characters made appearances during my efforts earlier this year to persuade the international community that the freedom fighters of Libya needed the world’s help.

Kol Nidre, Israel, and American Jews
October 08, 2011

Kol Nidre is the most haunting prayer in the Jewish liturgy. I would gauge that more Jews attend synagogue at this moment than at any other time in the year. (You’ve already missed it if you wanted to go.) For some it may be an act of desperation, a stance between belief and non-belief, hovering somewhere between trust and trembling. In any case, it is my or your—if you had decided to try—last chance to settle accounts with God, in the heavens or with the god of your imagination.

Arab Spring, My Foot
October 06, 2011

Or, better yet, “my ass.” The Arab Spring has been with us for nearly three quarters of a year. This is not a long time as history goes. But the annual flowers of the spare land have long ago vanished into the crude, mostly gritty sand that is the Middle East. It’s not, though, as if it is at all back to “normal” in the Arab world. And, frankly, we haven’t the slightest about what normal in the Arab world is or will be. The Muslims and the Jews and the increasingly scarce but differentiated Christians who constituted the region lived (and live) recreant lives.

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