San Antonio

These aren't the cheesy inspiration posters the Internet loves to mock. Still, can office art ever truly motivate people?

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It's not the GPS chip in student IDs that one family objects to.

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Nixon's suburban strategy isn't going to cut it for Republicans in 2016.

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A new poll shows Obama up by 2 points in Arizona, but could Obama really win the state?

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Obama's speech was effortful, uninspiring, and humblegragging.

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The DNC keynote speaker might be the next Barack Obama. But can he ever win statewide office in Texas?

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The Operator

Before 2013 begins, catch up on the best of 2012. From now until the New Year, we will be re-posting some of The New Republic’s most thought-provoking pieces of the year. Enjoy. In early 2010, Karl Rove convened a group of businessmen for lunch at a private club in Dallas. The guests included some of the richest and most influential people in Texas. T. Boone Pickens, the corporate raider from Amarillo, was there, as was Harlan Crow, the prodigal son of Trammell Crow, the most prominent real estate developer in the country in his day.

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When President Obama signed the Affordable Care Act two years ago, the law's proponents (including me) were confident of two things: That it would become more popular with time and that it would make our health care system more humane and efficient. History has not been kind to the first prediction. Most of the law’s components command broad support: Overwhelming majorities still support the requirement that insurers cover people with pre-existing conditions, for example. But overall the Affordable Care Act is unpopular.

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Santorum's Shake

Rick Santorum today sent his ill-advised comment from yesterday--that the country would be better off with four more years of President Obama than with Mitt Romney--down the memory hole. Then he gaslighted reporters about it.

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What's for lunch today? Once again, nothing at all if you're one of 23,000 inmates in the Texas state prisons, which have decided to eliminate weekend lunch in order to save $2.8 million this year.

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