United Nations

Obama's Strange Silence on Syria
Even before chemical weapons were used, there was a refugee crisis. Why won't the president act?
April 26, 2013

There's a refugee crisis. And now, chemical weapons have been used. When will the president act?

Could North Korea Nuke Washington?
March 08, 2013

No, they couldn't. A brief, somewhat comforting explainer

John Kerry's Quiet Campaign Pays Off
December 22, 2012

Just like Susan Rice, Senator John Kerry was one of candidate Barack Obama’s earliest supporters, back when it was risky. The conventional wisdom was that Hillary Clinton was going to win and the people who had failed to join her would be left with tombstones for careers. (“A Clinton never forgets,” the terrified saying went.) Just like Rice, Kerry hoped for a certain, specific prize. For Rice it was national security advisor; for Kerry, secretary of state.

The Migration Gift Exchange: Financial Flows from America’s Immigrants
December 21, 2012

This past Tuesday was International Migrants Day, declared by the United Nations to honor the contributions and sacrifices that international migrants make to both their destination and origin countries. As I’ve written previously, migrants are “economic ambassadors” that contribute to the growth of two economies simultaneously because they are more likely to be sending remittances--personal flows of money sent across international borders--to family members in their countries of origin. As many of us rush into the shopping malls this weekend for last minute gifts, the millions of migrants liv

Susan Rice Isn’t Going Quietly
December 20, 2012

BY THE TIME Susan Rice withdrew her name from the running for secretary of state earlier this month, she had emerged in the media as one of Washington’s most nefarious personalities.

Don't Let Chuck Hagel's Hardline Israel Critics Sink His Nomination
December 18, 2012

The former Republican senator deserves a fair shot to become the next Secretary of Defense.

Understanding Mohamed Morsi
December 07, 2012

ON A SULTRY MORNING in late September, I drove for two hours on the traffic-choked roads north of Cairo to Al Adwa, a Nile Delta town of dusty alleyways, mosques, and crumbling red brick houses. This is where Mohamed Morsi, the president of Egypt, was raised. Morsi left nearly four decades ago, but he returns regularly to visit his younger brothers, who still work the family farm, and to celebrate Islamic holidays.

Yehuda Amichai: New Translations by Robert Alter
December 07, 2012

Spy Many years ago I was sent to spy out the land beyond the age of thirty. I stayed there and I did not return to those who sent me, so that I would not have to tell them about that land and would not have to lie.   I Waited for My Girl and Her Steps Were Not There  I waited for my girl and her steps were not there. But I heard a shot—soldiers training for war. Soldiers are always training for some war.  Then I opened the collar of my shirt and the two lapel-edges pointed in two directions. And my neck rose between them— on it the crest of my quiet head bearing the fruit of my eyes.  And belo

The Fantasy of American Government and Why People Cling to It
December 07, 2012

Governing the World: The History of an IdeaBy Mark Mazower (Penguin Press, 475 pp., $29.95)   WE HAVE PASSED, Mark Mazower writes, “from an era that had faith in the idea of international institutions to one that has lost it.” Mazower, a prolific professor of history at Columbia, has written a challenging and thought-provoking history of that arc of disillusion. We certainly have reason to be disillusioned.

How To Judge The Right’s Flight From Romney
November 16, 2012

Republicans are rushing to distance themselves from Mitt Romney's “gifts” comments. Is it a genuine awakening, or an opportunistic cover-up?

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