Books

The Evolution of God By Robert Wright (Little, Brown, 567 pp., $25.99) I. Over its history, science has delivered two crippling blows to humanity's self-image. The first was Galileo's announcement, in 1632, that our Earth was just another planet and not, as Scripture implied, the center of the universe.

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Brothers

I made a paper replica of your skin and spread it across my face.   I still couldn't see the silence you drink. Our words slur as they mix up war   and experience. I fish for your wrist through this veil of trust and violence.   Help me find your hand to hold it.

Lists--III

The date's a sentence that can be parsed: pattern, symmetry, sequence. Can I parse the sky this morning, its complex syntax of cirrocumulus suggestions? The sunlight's breaking, broken. Light on the hills is thinner than yesterday's illumination. The flooding creek is still out of its banks, but lower. An impulse to measure, mark: the river the rain the times of sunrise sunset. I don't know how to take in the fact that we are at war: overreaching, aggressor, outlaw. In the garden snowdrops and trash, hyacinth heads pushing up like green tops of wooden newels, elaborately carved.

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Long regarded as central to the contemporary understanding of medical ethics are four principles that must be satisfied in order to fulfill the requirements of moral decision-making. These principles are autonomy, justice, beneficence, and non-maleficence.

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Rosenfeld's Lives: Fame, Oblivion, and the Furies of Writing By Steven J. Zipperstein (Yale University Press, 274 pp., $27.50) 'Zetland: By a Character Witness" may not be the best fifteen pages that Saul Bellow wrote, but it is surely the most concentratedly, turbulently Bellovian. "Yes, I knew the guy," the story begins. "We were boys in Chicago.

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Even that current rapid in the brainlike a digital signal cheeping "wherewhere where..." damps down in the broil of noon. Below, the ponds and metal rooftops flareto streaks. And my need, to peel the bright veneerfrom the world, and walk inside, and feel my life crucial as plotline... seems to disappear.The aspens sizzle. Towers of loosestrifeshiver with flies.

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Armenian Golgotha: A Memoir of the Armenian Genocide, 1915-1918By Grigoris Balakian, translated by Peter Balakian with Aris Sevag(Knopf, 509 pp., $35) Sorrowful Shores: Violence, Ethnicity, and the End of the Ottoman Empire, 1912-1923By Ryan Gingeras(Oxford University Press, 272 pp., $99) My Grandmother: A MemoirBy Fethiye Cetin(Verso, 114 pp., $21.95) On the morning of March 15, 1921, a thick-set man wearing a heavy overcoat was walking down Hardenbergstrasse in the Berlin suburb of Charlottenburg when he was shot at point-blank range in the back of the head, and died immediately in a bloody

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Life As A Poem

Songbook: The Selected Poems Of Umberto Saba Translated by George Hochfield and Leonard Nathan (Yale University Press, 562 pp., $35) Umberto Saba, a poet of mysterious and difficult simplicity, has been ushered back into English. The translation of poetry is never easy, but Saba presents particular challenges.

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The State as a Work of Art: The Cultural Origins of the ConstitutionBy Eric Slauter(University of Chicago Press, 373 pp., $40)Over the past two decades or so, sixty-nine countries--from the nations of post-communist Central and Eastern Europe, to South Africa, to Afghanistan and Iraq--have drafted constitutions. At the same time many other states have revised their constitutions on paper, and even the European Union has tried to get a constitution ratified. Consequently, only a few states in the world are without written constitutions.

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When she took a position in a distant city he knew He could not follow and in the months afterwards he built Them a home where she was still with him even Though they never lived together. Mornings they made coffee In this kitchen, washed the berries, read books on the long couch, Their legs touching in some configuration, and one would interrupt The other's reading to make some observation on the art They both practiced.

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