Calvin Coolidge

Barack Obama, You Remind Me of Herbert Hoover
January 05, 2010

Barack Obama has been compared to almost every American President of the last hundred years--favorably to Franklin Delano Roosevelt, John Kennedy, and Ronald Reagan; and unfavorably to Jimmy Carter and George H.W. Bush.

What Stuff!
January 17, 2005

by Christine Stansell

Idiot Time
July 08, 2002

Wealth and Democracy: A Political History of the American Rich by Kevin Phillips (Broadway Books, 432 pp., $29.95) Stupid White Men ... and Other Sorry Excuses for the State of the Nation! by Michael Moore (ReganBooks, 304 pp., $24.95) I. As Lord Bryce noted in 1888 in The American Commonwealth, the American way of choosing presidents rarely produces politicians of quality. Subsequent events vindicated his point: in the half-century after his book appeared, Americans elected to the presidency such undistinguished men as William McKinley, William Howard Taft, Warren G.

Half Lesson
April 12, 1975

Watchmen in the Night by Theodore C. Sorensen MIT Press; $8.95 "Watergate is like a Rorschach," Aaron Wildavsky observed at a Washington seminar last year.

Getting On With Governing
August 24, 1974

Insofar as goodwill can carry us through the next two years, the future is promising. Mr. Ford’s geniality, his informality, his sincerity and determination to do right lift the spirit. Watching the broad smile that never left the face of the Speaker of the House as he listened to President Ford address Congress last week, one knew that Mr. Nixon had really departed, that we had in his place a leader who is liked, who says what he means and means what he says. When the President spoke the word “candor,” it was as if one had suddenly met a long-lost and cherished friend.

Kennedy in '68?
October 15, 1966

In presidential politics, Calvin Coolidge is unique in choosing not to run. Any fool knows that a sitting President, if he wants it, can have his party's nomination for a second term. These truths are self-evident, and all evidence shows that Lyndon Johnson is not only sitting but running. Any incumbent President can make his will felt upon his party's state and city political structures, and Mr. Johnson is exceptionally adept at this kind of manipulation. Take the traditional largesse in the rivers and harbors bill. The doubtless apocryphal story of Mr.

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