China

In my last column, I argued that Singapore and China, so often praised for their achievements in education, are terrible models, bad even at generating a creative and accountable business culture, and hopeless in forming the preconditions of stable democracy. Rejecting their guidance, however, does not mean that we should turn away from Asia for insight. The humanistic traditions of both Korea and India offer much that we should applaud. Korea today is the only nation in the world, outside the U.S., that strongly promotes a liberal arts model of college and university education.

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Now that Tom Friedman has endorsed the construction of an Islamic center at Ground Zero no one can be against it.

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In places like Michigan, where the loss of auto and other manufacturing jobs has been so numerous and painful, China is viewed as a job-stealing, economy-weakening threat. But in Lansing, Michigan State University is the fulcrum of new business, research, and learning partnerships that are bringing Chinese spending, investors, and, thus, new jobs to mid-Michigan--and a new round of increased diversity and immigrant-led economic renewal to the local community. Leading science and technical universities, such as MSU, have always been a draw for foreign students.

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Annie Lee at China Hush relays the future of public transportation in China: the "straddling bus," which glides over other cars on the road. (Okay, it's technically called the "3D fast bus," but straddling bus is more apt.) Apart from looking cool, the idea makes practical sense. Many Chinese cities have severe congestion problems and need more public transit options. Buses can get bogged down amid the slow crawl of cars unless they have their own lanes, and if they do get their own lanes, they're hogging up road capacity. Not a problem for the straddling bus.

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Heather Hurlburt is executive director of the National Security Network. She wrote this in response to last week's item about liberal apathy. Jonathan Cohn falls into the same trap as his apathetic Netroots liberals as far as national security is concerned.

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The release of our new “Export Nation” report this week makes a strong argument that if the nation is going to begin “rebalancing” its off-kilter economy then U.S.

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The administration has put forth a goal of doubling U.S. in the next five years. It’s a tall order, especially considering the state of some potentially major export markets. Look at China. In his latest book, “The Betrayal of American Prosperity” Clyde Prestowitz makes the incorrect assertion that while China’s number one export to the United States is computers and electronics, the top U.S. export to China is waste paper and scrap metal.

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This past week saw a marked escalation in the ongoing struggle for geopolitical preponderance in East Asia between the United States and China. Twenty years ago, at the close of the Cold War, U.S. forces in the region had enormous advantages over their Chinese counterparts. Using ships, aircraft and troops forward-deployed at facilities in Japan, South Korea, Thailand, and Singapore, supported by others dispatched from Hawaii and the West Coast, the United States could defend its friends, deter its enemies and move its forces freely throughout the western Pacific.

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The Publisher: Henry Luce and His American Century By Alan Brinkley (Knopf, 531 pp., $35) I. Sometimes human beings bring sociological theory to life. Consider the career of Henry Luce. A child of Presbyterian missionaries in China, he pursued wealth and power with unremitting zeal, creating the media empire that dominated American journalism for much of the twentieth century: Time, Inc. Yet Luce never lost touch with his didactic origins, never abandoned the conviction that his magazines should teach Americans the right way of thinking about the world.

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Pabst Blue Ribbon is being sold in China... as an ultra-high end luxury drink: In America it's called PBR and is the blue-collar/hipster beverage of choice. In China it's called Pabst Blue Ribbon 1844 and will run you $44 a bottle. Pretty steep for a beer whose biggest draw in the U.S.

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