China

CPAC: Donald Trump Can't Be Serious About Running. Can He?
February 10, 2011

The big news out of this year's Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC)? Donald Trump—oh yes, Donald Trump—might run for president in 2012, as a Republican. He was a last-minute addition to the speaker's roster, and after he bounded up on stage here at the Marriott Wardman in Washington, D.C.—to calls of "You're Hired!"—he told the ecstatic crowd of conservatives that he'd make a decision by June. "The United States has become a whipping post for the rest of the world," Trump said.

Does Huntsman Stand a Chance in 2012?
February 02, 2011

The Beltway is buzzing over former Utah Governor Jon Huntsman’s suddenly revived 2012 ambitions. Huntsman is reportedly about to resign as Obama’s ambassador to China in order to “explore” a White House bid, and a cabal of advisers who were prominent in John McCain’s 2008 campaign is plotting his strategy. At least on one level, the Huntsman boomlet isn’t terribly surprising.

Mega-Minded: Creating the World’s Biggest Metro
February 01, 2011

with Carey Anne Nadeau NEW YORK--Federal, state, and local governments along the upper Eastern seaboard yesterday announced a $300 billion, five-year plan to fully integrate 12 metropolitan areas stretching from Boston to Washington, D.C., with upgraded transportation, energy, water, and telecommunications networks. The new Northeast Corridor (or “NoCo,” superseding “Bos-Wash”) region (see map) will house upwards of 44 million people and generate about 19 percent of U.S.

Silicon Implant
January 27, 2011

When Dmitri Medvedev became Russia’s president in 2008, he projected a very different image from that of his predecessor. Vladimir Putin is a buff former KGB agent who is fond of rugged pursuits, such as hunting and fishing, and is frequently photographed engaged in them without his shirt on. Medvedev is an elfin St. Petersburg-trained lawyer who enjoys chess and photography, practices yoga daily, and is the proud owner of the complete recordings of Deep Purple on vinyl.

The Free-Floater
January 27, 2011

Ernest Gellner: An Intellectual Biography By John A. Hall (Verso, 400 pp., $49.95) John A. Hall concludes his account of Ernest Gellner by observing that his outlook on the world was austere. “But therein lies its attraction,” he goes on. “Not much real comfort for our woes is on offer; the consolations peddled in the market are indeed worthless.

Mother Superior
January 27, 2011

Amy Chua’s Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother, a memoir about raising children “the Chinese way,” has provoked, well, a reaction.

The Belligerents
January 27, 2011

Each year, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) and its affiliated organizations hold hundreds of meetings, at which officials from countries across Asia come together to issue bland, verbose communiqués about everything from agriculture management to the handling of spiny dogfish and to listen to interchangeable speeches by government officials. Along with an inevitable level of boredom, the meetings feature exaggerated, affected displays of courtesy that would not have been out of place at the Tudor Court.

Are U.S. Financial Markets Sending Manufacturing Jobs to China?
January 19, 2011

Consternation over the loss of manufacturing jobs to China was aroused again recently when Evergreen Solar announced that it would move 800 manufacturing jobs from a decommissioned Devens, Mass. military base to China. In an article by Keith Bradsher of The New York Times, Evergreen’s CEO claims that producing in China is more competitive because its local governments offer partnerships that bring very low-interest rate loans from state-owned banks compared to what U.S banks were offering. For U.S.

Take Only Pictures
January 18, 2011

When Chinese President Hu Jintao meets his American counterpart at the White House tomorrow, he will undoubtedly go through the motions of engaging him on substantive matters. But there will be little in the way of agreement: At the last summit, in November 2009, China and the United States released a 4,223-word joint statement that became a dead letter within three weeks, after acrimonious exchanges at the Copenhagen Climate Summit.

Richard Holbrooke in Asia
December 20, 2010

While sitting in Istanbul‘s Attaturk International Airport waiting for a flight, I was stunned to hear a BBC announcer report that my colleague and friend U.S. Ambassador Richard Holbrooke had just died. I knew that he had been rushed to George Washington University Hospital with a torn aorta. But, despite the seriousness of his condition, it was still unimaginable that he would not recover. After all, had “Holbrooke,” as his friends and colleagues always referred to him, not always prevailed?

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