Reading

You don't read Shakespeare in a straight line, and other lessons from eye-tracking research

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The printed page still matters, even where you wouldn't expect it.

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In 2007, several n+1 editors discussed books they’d read or wished they had read in college. The series of dialogues was published in a pamphlet called What We Should Have Known. A new pamphlet, No Regrets, which came out this week, reprises the 2007 panel’s questions (What do you wish you had read in college? What books changed you?) but restricts the conversation to women.

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With the long Holiday weekend ahead of us, here is a collection of links. If you have some free time, or just need to get away from family, these articles are all worth reading.--Mark Lynch, in Foreign Policy, has an important piece explaining why the Obama administration is not getting tough with Egypt's generals.

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Obama's strength in southeastern Pennsylvania is just a little too much for Republicans to overcome.

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The Best American book series is valuable, but needs to be saved from its own outdatedness.

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In the September 13 issue of TNR, Richard Posner reviewed Reading Law, a new book by Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia and Bryan A. Garner. Soon afterwards, TNR published an exchange between Garner and Posner about the review. Here, Posner responds to the latest critical response by Antonin Scalia: Reuters invited me to respond to a statement made by Justice Scalia in an interview of him by Stephen Adler on September 17. The statement comments on a purported statement of mine in a review in the New Republic of Reading Law by Justice Scalia and Bryan Garner.

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Last month Richard A. Posner, a Chicago judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals, reviewed Antonin Scalia’s new book, Reading Law: The Interpretation of Legal Texts. Our review has apparently hit a nerve. To recap:  Posner accused the staunchly conservative justice of taking a hypocritical and “disingenuous” stance on his passive interpretation of law.

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I never met Roger Fisher, who died last month, nor read his much-acclaimed book on negotiations, Getting To Yes. But I gather he was something of a legend around Harvard and in academic circles in the field of negotiating theory. His death prompted a number of warm pieces about academic negotiations studies, highlighting his role as something of an entrepreneur who devoted his life to searching out conflicts to be resolved and yeses to be gotten.

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BRYAN A. GARNER:Hardly was I surprised that Judge Richard A. Posner did not warmly embrace Reading Law, the book on textualism I coauthored with Justice Antonin Scalia.

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